Publications

2012
The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities
Mylonas, Harris. 2012. The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract
What drives a state’s choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state’s nation-building policies toward non-core groups - any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state - are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups. Through a detailed study of the Balkans, Mylonas shows that the way a state treats a non-core group within its own borders is determined largely by whether the state’s foreign policy is revisionist or cleaves to the international status quo, and whether it is allied or in rivalry with that group’s external patrons. Mylonas explores the effects of external involvement on the salience of cultural differences and the planning of nation-building policies. The Politics of Nation-Building injects international politics into the study of nation-building, building a bridge between international relations and the comparative politics of ethnicity and nationalism. This is the first book to explain systematically how the politics of ethnicity in the international arena determine which groups arWhat drives a state’s choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this pathbreaking work on the international politics of nation-building, Harris Mylonas argues that a state’s nation-building policies toward non-core groups—any aggregation of individuals perceived as an unassimilated ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state—are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups. Through a detailed study of the Balkans, Mylonas shows that the way a state treats a non-core group within its own borders is determined largely by whether the state’s foreign policy is revisionist or cleaves to the international status quo, and whether it is allied or in rivalry with that group’s external patrons. Mylonas explores the effects of external involvement on the salience of cultural differences and the planning of nation-building policies. The Politics of Nation-Building injects international politics into the study of nation-building, building a bridge between international relations and the comparative politics of ethnicity and nationalism. This is the first book to explain systematically how the politics of ethnicity in the international arena determine which groups are assimilated, accommodated, or annihilated by their host states.
Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876-1945
Uchida, Jun. 2012. Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876-1945. Cambridge: Harvard University Asia Center.Abstract
Brokers of Empire explores the phenomenon of Japanese settlers in Korea in more detail, and with greater nuance, than has been offered before in English. At once “pawns” and “agents” of colonial power, Japanese settlers operated as a group and as individuals between the official Japanese ruling power and the Koreans surrounding them. With an interest in Japanese power in Korea and in the metropole, they also looked to their own interests outside the official colonial state, and many prospered in Korea. Using oral and textual sources in Korean and Japanese, the book draws a portrait of these “brokers of empire,” as Uchida describes them, and their distinct yet hitherto discreet role in supporting the colonial enterprise.
Ethnic Struggle, Coexistence, and Democratization in Eastern Europe
Stroschein, Sherrill. 2012. Ethnic Struggle, Coexistence, and Democratization in Eastern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract
In societies divided on ethnic and religious lines, problems of democracy are magnified – particularly where groups are mobilized into parties. With the principle of majority rule, minorities should be less willing to endorse democratic institutions where their parties persistently lose elections. While such problems should also hamper transitions to democracy, several diverse Eastern European states have formed democracies even under these conditions. In this book, Sherrill Stroschein argues that sustained protest and contention by ethnic Hungarians in Romania and Slovakia brought concessions on policies that they could not achieve through the ballot box, in contrast to Transcarpathia, Ukraine. In Romania and Slovakia, contention during the 1990s made each group accustomed to each other's claims and aware of the degree to which each could push its own. Ethnic contention became a de facto deliberative process that fostered a moderation of group stances, allowing democratic consolidation to slowly and organically take root.
Alliance Formation in Civil Wars
Fotini, Christia. 2012. Alliance Formation in Civil Wars. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract
Some of the most brutal and long-lasting civil wars of our time – those in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Lebanon, and Iraq, among others – involve the rapid formation and disintegration of alliances among warring groups, as well as fractionalization within them. It would be natural to suppose that warring groups form alliances based on shared identity considerations – such as Christian groups allying with Christian groups, or Muslim groups with their fellow co-religionists – but this is not what we see. Two groups that identify themselves as bitter foes one day, on the basis of some identity narrative, might be allies the next day and vice versa. Nor is any group, however homogeneous, safe from internal fractionalization. Rather, looking closely at the civil wars in Afghanistan and Bosnia and testing against the broader universe of fifty-three cases of multiparty civil wars, Fotini Christia finds that the relative power distribution between and within various warring groups is the primary driving force behind alliance formation, alliance changes, group splits, and internal group takeovers.
2011
Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire that Lost the Cultural Cold War
Roth-Ey, Kristin. 2011. Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire that Lost the Cultural Cold War. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Abstract

In this intriguing account of Soviet mass-culture after WWII, Kristin Roth-Ey delineates how it grew explosively in an attempt to make good socialism’s promise of “high-quality cultural experience on an everyday basis,” delivering more and more individualized Soviet forms of mass media uncorrupted by the degraded “masscult” of the West. Moscow Prime Time analyses the growth and maturity of this important cultural initiative - especially in film and television - that was intimately bound to the Soviet experiment, and ultimately unable to save it.

2010
Skeletons in the Closet: Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Europe
Nalepa, Monika. 2010. Skeletons in the Closet: Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract

After communist regimes in Eastern Europe fell after 1989, the pattern of “lustration,” of shedding light on the Communist past, took different forms in the early years of the new regimes. These arose from complex patterns of bargaining, but showed an unexpected willingness of former rulers to allow disclosure of the past. Monika Nalepa’s path-breaking book re-examines the process by which this took place through qualitative and quantitative means in nine East Central Europe countries. Skeletons in the Closet argues that secrets of past collaboration played a prominent role in stabilizing the transition to representative democracy and in the timing and content of subsequent transitional justice laws.

2008
Distrusting Democrats: Outcomes of Participatory Constitution Making
Moehler, Devra C. 2008. Distrusting Democrats: Outcomes of Participatory Constitution Making. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.Abstract

The late twentieth century's wave of democratization has offered a laboratory to understand better the dynamics of democracy. In Distrusting Democrats Harvard Academy Scholar Devra C. Moehler addresses the question: does participation in democratic politics - in this case Uganda's constitution-making from 1988-1995 - strengthen democracy? Distrusting Democrats is based on a survey of 820 Ugandan citizens, all of voting age as constitution writing, discussion and voting took place. Her analysis nuances traditional expectations that participation alone is conducive to democratic attitudes. Moehler's study shows that involvement in fledgling democratic politics stimulates participation, but may also produce what she terms “distrusting democrats” - informed, experienced, yet disappointed citizens whose political involvement raised expectations that were not met. Distrusting Democrats explores this phenomenon, and suggests how democratic participation may ultimately be made more widely supportive of democratic government.

2007
Accountability without Democracy: Solidarity Groups and Public Goods Provision in Rural China
Tsai, Lily L. 2007. Accountability without Democracy: Solidarity Groups and Public Goods Provision in Rural China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract

Observers of modern China have noted the stark differences in the kinds of public expenditure undertaken by villages in rural China, villages often located right next to each other. The differences in social services and public amenities between villages in rural China cannot be accounted for by just the exercise of democratic activity, nor by direction from the central government. Instead, these differences are produced by the informal means of exercising accountability and control over officials by village and temple organizations, and family lineages. Lily Tsai's book is an exploration of the unseen mechanisms of public life in rural China - a study of how governance in rural China at the local level cannot be understood through democratic institutional forms alone.

Accountability Without Democracy has been selected as the winner of the 2007/2008 Dogan Award from the Society for Comparative Research.

Politics and Volunteering in Japan: A Global Perspective
Haddad, Mary Alice. 2007. Politics and Volunteering in Japan: A Global Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract

Mary Alice Haddad's book is a comparative examination of the sometimes crucial phenomenon in democratic societies: volunteering. Yet patterns of volunteering vary across cultures. These differences are measured in this important study as a combination of citizen's attitudes toward their government, their own society's patterns of expectations and practices, and the sense of responsible individualism found in each society. Politics and Volunteering in Japan develops a predictive model for understanding volunteering across cultures from a comparison of three Japanese cites, and tests it against patterns of volunteering in Finland, Japan, Turkey and the United States.

Globalization and Business Politics in Arab North Africa: A Comparative Perspective
Cammett, Melani Claire. 2007. Globalization and Business Politics in Arab North Africa: A Comparative Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract

The adjustments to a global economy have produced varied industry/ state relations throughout the world, but perhaps nowhere as crucially as in the developing industrial countries. Melani Cammett's Globalization and Business Politics finds that these forms of cooperation rely on past relations of the state and industry. Her subtle comparative analysis of the textile and clothing industries in Morocco and Tunisia encompasses the social, political, economic, and historical forces that shaped - and continue to shape- these contrasting examples. Success in this new environment depends crucially, Globalization and Business Politics suggests, on new and productive ways that state, society, and industries can develop means of persistent, ongoing, and adaptive mutual support.

2006
An Enchanted Modern: Gender and Public Piety in Shi'i Lebanon
Deeb, Lara. 2006. An Enchanted Modern: Gender and Public Piety in Shi'i Lebanon. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Abstract

Lara Deeb's An Enchanted Modern concerns the many ways religious piety has been reborn and reshaped in the Shi'i neighborhood of Al-Dahiyya in Beirut. She presents an engrossing anthropological account of a community fashioning a creative and rich religious modernity. Deeb encounters a vibrant, redirected, Islamic life, reshaped by the politics of the recent past, creatively re-imagined and lived in the present, with no sign of losing its centrality to individuals, communities and states in the future. Most notably, it is an Islamic life that is expressed in especially creative ways in the public and private lives of women. The modern pious includes women involved, educated, outspoken and part of a community, at odds at points with Western notions of modernity, and equally powerful and attractive.

2004
Foundations of Despotism: Peasants, the Trujillo Regime, and Modernity in Dominican History
Turits, Richard. 2004. Foundations of Despotism: Peasants, the Trujillo Regime, and Modernity in Dominican History. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.Abstract

This book explores the history of the Dominican Republic as it evolved from the first European colony in the Americas into a modern nation under the rule of Rafael Trujillo. Turits reveals how the seemingly unilateral imposition of power by Trujillo in fact depended on the regime's mediation of profound social and economic transformations, especially through agrarian policies that assisted the nation's large independent peasantry. Most of the existing literature casts the Trujillo dictatorship as the paradigm of despotic rule through coercion and terror alone. This book elucidates instead the hidden foundations of the regime, portraying everyday life and economy in the Dominican countryside and the exchanges between state and society under Trujillo. Winner of the American Historical Association's John Edwin Fagg Prize for the best publication in Latin American history.

2003
The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Belarus, 1569-1999
Snyder, Timothy. 2003. The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Belarus, 1569-1999. New Haven: Yale University Press.Abstract

Moving from the sixteenth century to the present, and using a wide array of multi-lingual sources, The Reconstruction of Nations shows how multiple versions of national identity evolved and competed with each other in what are now Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, and Ukraine. Snyder contends that the triumph of modern ethnic nationalism in this part of Eastern Europe is very recent. Federalism and communal toleration were considered viable national ideas from the 16th through 20th centuries - only the atrocities of the Second World War buried such traditional alternatives. Snyder's original explanations for these atrocities include the first scholarly account of the Ukrainian-Polish ethnic cleansings of the 1940s. Snyder concludes with an analysis of the peaceful resolution of national tensions in the region since 1989.

The Reconstruction of Nations is a winner of the American Historical Association's George Louis Beer Prize for the best publication in European international history since 1895.

Political Topographies of the African State
Boone, Catherine. 2003. Political Topographies of the African State. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Abstract

Political Topographies shows that central rulers' powers, ambitions, and strategies of control vary across subregions of the national space, even in countries reputed to be highly centralized. Boone argues that this unevenness reflects a state-building logic that is shaped by differences in the political economy of regions - that is, by relations of property, production, and authority that determine the political clout and economic needs of regional-level elites. Center-provincial bargaining, rather than the unilateral choices of the center, is what drives the politics of national integration and determines how institutions distribute power. Boone's innovative analysis speaks to scholars and policy makers who want to understand geographic unevenness in the centralization and decentralization of power, in the nature of citizenship and representation, and in patterns of core-periphery integration and breakdown in many of the world's multiethnic or regionally divided states.

2001
Harrison, Lawrence E, and Samuel Huntington. 2001. Culture Matters: How Values Shape Human Progress. New York: Basic Books.Abstract

The 2000-2001 academic year saw the release of a major publication from the Academy's Global Cultures Program. Arising from a 1999 Harvard Academy symposium, Culture Matters: How Values Shape Human Progress was published in 2001 by Basic Books. The book is edited by Lawrence Harrison (an Academy affiliate and author of Underdevelopment is a State of Mind) and Academy Chairman Samuel Huntington.

Culture Matters examines the question of why some countries and ethnic groups are better off than others, and the role that cultural values play in driving political, economic, and social development. A distinguished group of scholars, journalists, and practitioners looks at the role of culture in developmental contexts across the globe. Among this diverse group of contributors are Francis Fukuyama, Nathan Glazer, Ronald Inglehart, Seymour Martin Lipset, Orlando Patterson, Michael Porter, Jeffrey Sachs, and Richard Shweder. Most of these contributors but not all conclude that cultural values are a powerful factor in promoting development and value change is indispensable to future progress in underdeveloped countries.

Described as "stunning" by Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Culture Matters was favorably reviewed in such diverse publications as Time, The Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Affairs. It has stimulated extensive discussion in the United States and other countries, been the subject of a long story in The New York Times, and is being translated or has been translated into seven foreign languages.

2000
The Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in North America and Europe
Andreas, Peter, and Timothy Snyder. 2000. The Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in North America and Europe. New York: Rowman & Littlefield.Abstract

In 1999, responding to the initiative of Academy Scholars Peter Andreas and Timothy Snyder, the Academy sponsored a project and a conference dealing with the efforts of the United States and Western European countries to control immigration. This resulted in a book, The Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in North America and Europe (Rowman and Littlefield, 2000), edited by Snyder and Andreas.

In March 2001, the Academy held a symposium on the issues raised by the book. Challenging the conventional wisdom of a "borderless" future, The Wall Around the West demonstrates that, far from disappearing, many borders are being redrawn and reinforced by state regulators. Focusing on economic divides in North America (the southern border of the United States) and Europe (the eastern and southern borders of the European Union), the contributors to the volume show how the regulatory apparatus of the state is being "transformed, not transcended" in such important issue areas as trade, immigration, and drug trafficking. At the March symposium, the editors responded to commentaries on the volume by Academy Senior Scholars Samuel Huntington and John Coatsworth, as well as Academy Scholar Keith Darden.